Launching Flask on Port 80 without using sudo

Flask is a great python based HTTP server that’s really small and easy/fast to setup, it is really useful for deploying small Web based User Interfaces for IoT type devices.  By default flask will attach itself to port 5000.  To get my flask script to attach to port 80 I use:

This works fine, the only problem is that in order to successfully attach to port 80 the script must be run as root, so instead of just running:

I have to run:

Which isn’t great.

To get around this problem I used the tool: authbind

To Install:

And configure it for access to port 80:

(Not sure if the very loose 777 permission is required, must experiment)

Now I just have to launch my flask UI script using authbind and it will take care of the script’s permissions to bind to port 80 and I can connect from a browser:

More info on authbind here

Octave – Can’t scroll Window, Workaround

Strange problem with Octave (my version is 4.4.0), in the GUI I can’t scroll the ‘Command Window’, so if some code outputs lots of info I can’t scroll up to see it all, the window keeps jumping to the bottom as I try to scroll!

I am not sure why its happening, but a workaround is to enter the ‘pause’ command within the window, once pause executes I can scroll to my heart’s content.  I  then hit ctrl-c to exit pause.

It is possible that installing a newer version of Octave would fix this but I am not bothered to upgrade at the moment as all of the Maths bits seem to work very well!

 

Paho Javascript Client – Figure out received message’s MQTT topic

When using the Paho Javascript client from MQTT; when a message arrives via client.onMessageArrived(), how can we figure out the message’s topic.

This threw me for a bit as the documentation for the message object doesn’t mention ‘topic’ at all – but it turns out that the topic name is stored in the message.destinationName field! (panic over)

KDevelop hangs during C++ build on ARM Odroid N2

I have been using Hardkernel’s new Odroid N2 to develop a computer vision system with multiple Basler USB3 cameras. I have been using KDevelop on the Odroid to engineer the C++ code and in general all has been going very well (the Odroid N2 is a fantastic device). I did however hit an occasional problem where KDevelop would cause the Odroid to ‘hang’ during a build – especially when re-building a lot of files.

On investigation it seemed like KDevelop was just using up too much memory and putting the Odroid into a very bad place, sometimes the system would free up after a (long) period of time but most often it wouldn’t, it just ground to a halt thrashing memory (I presume). I am using the boost libraries and I think that a lot of IDEs and build systems have problems with boost as it’s very big! (Clion does especially!)

Anyway the solution was to limit how many parallel build instances (or jobs as it calls them) that KDevelop can run, to do this open the ‘Project / Open Configuration..’ menu and click on the ‘Make’ tab in the left-hand column, now check the ‘Override number of simultaneous jobs’ checkbox, and enter a number in the ‘Number of Simultaneous jobs’ box. A value of 3 works well for me, the builds are a little slower but no longer hang the system! I might try increasing it to see if I can get away with quicker builds…

A faster alternative to the very slow GetPixel() and SetPixel() for .Net System.Drawing.Bitmap

Anybody who works with images often have probably come across .Net Bitmaps (System.Drawing.Bitmap) with their staggeringly slow GetPixel() and SetPixel() methods. Now, if you are going to work directly with images then you’re probably in the wrong place if you are using C# and .Net. However, sometimes you may want to do a small amount image analysis or manipulation from within .Net without the pain of having to pull in any other image libraries – but you find that GetPixel() and SetPixel() are just way too slow to use!

Now there is a faster way to access or manipulate the pixel data stored in a .Net Bitmap, that is to lock it (using LockBits()) and then directly access the raw image data in memory – you unlock it when you’re finished. This method is a lot faster than using Get/SetPixel() but is quite complicated to implement and it’s very messy to look at!

To get around this problem, and to avoid littering my code with gibberish I have written a bitmap wrapper class that wraps a bitmap, locks it, and provides it’s own GetPixel() and SetPixel() functions with which the original bitmap’s image data can be accessed. Using this class you can get fast access to a bitmap while using the familiar Get/SetPixel() paradigm – in this way it should act as a fairly easy drop in replacement for accessing the Bitmap objects directly.

The class is called BmpPixelSnoop and it is used like this:

First a BmpPixelSnoop object is created to wrap the bitmap, GetPixel() and SetPixel() can then be called on it. When the BmpPixelSnoop object is destroyed (on leaving the using() block) the original bitmap will be unlocked. It is important to note, that while the bitmap is being snooped the original bitmap object cannot be accessed as it’s locked! Currently BmpPixelSnoop only works for bitmaps with a Pixel Format of PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb which is the default format for Bitmaps (if you don’t specify an alternative when creating them).

So for a little extra complication you get easy & fast access to the bitmap data – but how much faster than the native Get/SetPixel() is it? My (non scientific) tests seem to indicate that it’s about 10 times faster, which is fast enough for simple imaging tasks. It is still quite inefficient however, this is a result of wanting to provide the same Get/SetPixel() interface as System.Drawing.Bitmap – for example, GetPixel() always returns all of the pixel data even if you just want to access the red component and hence is slower than it needs to be in this case. I may add extra accessor methods in the future to cater for other usage patterns and greater efficiency.

The code can be found in the git-hub repo: https://github.com/kgodden/DotNetPixelSnoop.

The class is defined in BmpPixelSnoop.cs, there is also some test code to check correctness and performance in Program.cs.

Here is the code:

Here is some sample output from the colsone based test program, showing relative times:

Boost ASIO Simple UDP Send Packet Example

Boost.ASIO is great but if you don’t use it everyday it can be hard to remember how to use it to do even the simplest of things. I have included below a sample of simply sending a packet via UDP (ipv4), see the function called send_message(), this example code aims to be as minimal as it can be:

Those spouting software engineering dogma will often tell you to steer well clear of UDP for the usual, well understood reasons, but for a certain type of application where very low latency is important, it just can’t be beat!!

This is the bare-bones code, no error reporting etc. Also it won’t broadcast, to allow for broadcast you need to include the following two lines and supply a broadcast ip address when calling the function. Be careful if broadcasting a lot of data as it can really overload & mess-up network equipment!

Fixed – KDevelop not stopping at breakpoints on Ubuntu Mate

I couldn’t get KDevelop to stop at breakpoints even on simple ‘hello world’ C++ projects. It appeared that CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE was being correctly set and GDB worked fine from the command-line, but from within kdevelop breakpoints were never respected! I think the problem stemmed from the Cache Value for CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE being empty, this value can be seen in the Project / Open Configuration… menu:

kdevelop breakpoint broken

Following the advice from this post I added the following into the project’s CMakeLists.txt file:

[Originally from here]

I ran clean & rebuild etc. and then cache value was set correctly to ‘Debug’ and the debugger happily stops at breakpoints!

I hope this post helps folks as I spent _ages_ trying to get the breakpoints to work!!

ExifTool- Query Exif Maker Note by ID on Command line

In Exif, each maker-note will have a unique (hex) id. ExifTool can be used to query a maker note’s contents by its id as follows:

This will return the value for makernote id 0x0013 contained in image.jpg.

PCL LNK2001 unresolved external symbol EuclideanClusterExtraction extract()

I have been getting the following linker error when building with the Point Cloud Library (PCL 1.8.1) in Visual Studio 2017 – not at all sure why:

I found that to get rid of the linker error I needed to include:

Again I am not sure why, and it is not usual to have to include impl/* files? – I may look into it a bit further if I get a chance but for now I am happy that my code links!

Hack – Sleeping for less that 1 second in Shell / Bash Script

To sleep in your shell script in units of 1 second – sleep will see you right. However what if you want to sleep for less than one second, say for 200ms?

On some newer system you can do something like this and everything is fine:

However when I try this on my embedded busybox device I just get a response like this:

So no luck there!

However there is a nice little hack using read, have a look at this:

This will wait for 200ms and then return! It waits for a line of text that never arrives, and times-out after 200ms – in effect it sleeps for 200ms. Now, if read receives a line during the 200ms it will return early, so only use it in cases where you’re sure it won’t or you might end up (temporarily) confused!

It’s not pretty but is better than nothing 😉